351st Bomb Group

Polebrook, England

Group Mission #106

Credited Mission #100

 
DATE: 11 Apr. 1944
Secondary Targets: Lead Box - Pommersche Motorenbau,
Arnimswalde, Germany
Low Box - Factory near Gülzow, Germany
 
Outline for Briefing:
  1. Airplane and Crew Assignment Check.
    C.O.’s Comment: ____

  2. Time Schedule:
     Lead Box Low Box
    Stations – 0650Stations - 0650
    Start Engines – 0700Start Engines – 0710 (Outboards)
    Taxi - 0710Taxi - 0720
    Take Off - 0725Take Off - Behind Lead Box
    Leave Splasher #4 - 0834Leave Splasher #4 - 0834
    Last Take Off - 0840Last Take Off - 0840

  3. Targets:
    Primary: Cottbus [Germany - 65 miles SSE of Berlin]
    Secondary: Arnimswalde – near Stettin [39 miles SE of Stettin now called Szczecin, Poland]
    Last Resort: Any military objective in Germany.

  4. Loading:
    High Box: Incendiaries
    Lead Box: 10 x 500# + 1 SkyMarker in Lead & Deputy.
    Low Box: 10 x 500#
    Nickels [Propaganda Leaflets] in Ship # - 975-O – stay in rear low slot.

  5. Gasoline Loading:
    Tokyos [Planes with extra wing fuel tanks]: Full gas load
    Non-Tokyos:
    Remarks: Conserve at all times.

  6. Wing Formation94th (A) CBW94th (B) CBWComp. GroupComp. CBW
    Lead401351 A
    Low401351 B
    High457305th

  7. Division Formation:
    PositionCBW [Combat Wing]TargetDeparture Time at Coast
    Lead40thSorau0912 Orfordness
    2nd1stCottbus0912
    3rd94th "A"Sorau0916
    4th94th "B"Cottbus0916
    5th41st "A"Sorau0920
    6th41st "B"Sorau0920
    7th
    8th
    2nd Division4 CW'sOschersleben0900 at Cromer
    Bernberg0900 at Cromer
    3rd Division5 CW'sKrzesinki & Posen0830 at Cromer
    Marauders [B-26]
    RAF [Royal Air Force]
    Remarks: Zero hour = 0830.

  8. Fighter Cover:
    • Penetration:
      [Force][Longitude][Call Sign]
      1 Group, P-47’s0600E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-1
      2 Groups, P-47’s0810E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-2, 3-3
      3 Groups, P-51’s0950E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-4, 3-5, 3-6
      2 Groups, P-51’s1300E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-8
      1 Group, P-51’s1520E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-9

    • Withdrawal:
      [Force][Longitude][Call Sign]
      1 Sqdn., P-38’s1232E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-10
      1 Grp. P-47’s1010E To Limit of rangeDenver 3-11

      10 Grps. 47’s, 3 Grps. 38’s, 3 RAF Sqdns. P-51’s – area support for 2nd & 3rd Divisions.
      Total Fighters – 27 Grps. of fighters – 150 A/C [Aircraft].

  9. Group Assembly is:
    BoxAltitudePlace
    Lead7000'Splasher #4
    Low5500’Splasher #4
    High8500’Splasher #4

  10. Navigator - _____
  11. S-2 - _____
  12. Weather - _____
  13. Special Instructions to Navigators, Bombardiers:
    Be especially careful in reporting to Pilot any dinghies or B-17’s in distress over water.
    Don’t wait until Hot News Table to report. [Interrogation after the Mission.]
    In case of landing in Sweden the GEE [Navigation Unit] & IFF will be destroyed.
    Chaff will be released on Code word by CW Lead for 10 minutes.
    This is the 100th Credited Mission of the Group. Only 3 others have reached it so far.

  14. Squadron Leaders and Group Deputy report to Target Room. All but Pilots Dismissed.
  15. (A) Code Words –
    PFF Bombing  Chaff –Rat Paste
    Visual Bombing  IP -Green Hat
    Authenticator –Dagwood
    Recall -Easy Victor Sail Easy
    Division Lead  Weather word -AVBTI

    (B) Call Signs:
    Call SignFlaresTail Letters
    Lead351st ASmokestack RedRY [Red Yellow]J
    Low351st BSmokestack BrownRJ
    High305th ASmokestack BlueGG
    401st B
    457th A
      B
    94th ACompositeWoodcraft WhiteRY
    1st C.B.W.SwordfishRR
    40th C.B.W.FoxholeYY
    41st C.B.W.CowboyGG
    41stComposite C.B.W.Buckeye

    (C)
    U.S. Fighters[Denver 3-1 to 3-11]
    R.A.F. Fighters
     BombersGoldsmith Three Four
    U.S. Grnd. ControlTackline
    R.A.F. Grnd. Control
    Remarks: Control Points 5 in number Nav.

    (D)
    Colors of the Day
    TimeColorLetterChallenge
    0800 – 1400Y-YROZ
    1400 – 2000RYLH
    2000 – 0200GYQI

    (E) Ships To Monitor [Radio Channels A, B, C & D]
    1. - None
    2. - All A/C except
    3. - 153-F & 848-C // 157-N & 994-T from 1st FRV until Eng. Coast.
    4. -
  16. Let-Down on Splasher #4, if overcast.
    351st A   200° Mag. [Magnetic Compass Heading]
    351st B   185° Mag. [Magnetic Compass Heading]
    305th A   215° Mag.

  17. Flying Control. –
    1. Taxi Plan.
    2. Emergency Fields.
    3. Landing Aids.

  18. Special Instructions:
    Pattern yesterday was not too good, Bombing O.K., flatten out formation and pull well forward for bombing.
    Don’t fail to do everything possible for A/C in distress, use all aids, IFF, W/T, Channel D.
    Radio silence will be observed by all except CW Leader where use is necessary.
    Channel B will be used for inter-bomber communication.


Operational Narrative – Lead & Low Boxes:
  1. General Narrative – Lead Box. The Lead Box of eighteen aircraft took off as scheduled and proceeded to Splasher 4 at 7,000 feet for the briefed assembly. There was a thin layer of clouds above the Lead Group, but the Combat Wing Air Commander decided to let the High Group assemble above the clouds. As soon as the Lead and Low Groups were assembled, they climbed through the clouds to find the High Group practically in Wing formation. All points were made on time, with the exception of the departure point, which was reached two minutes early. The 94th "B" Combat Wing left on course to the left and abreast of the 94th “A” Combat Wing.
     Heavy and accurate flak was encountered most of the way in, but the formation was maneuvered around the worst of it. The target area was found to be seven-tenths low cloud. The low altitude at which the planes were flying cut down the forward visibility. The IP [Initial Point of Bomb Run] was reached and the Combat Wing took interval for bombing. The aforementioned cloud cover prevented dropping bombs on the primary. The bomb bay doors were closed and the formation proceeded to the secondary target. The same clouded situation prevailed in this area; but the target was located in time to permit a short bombing run. The High and Low Groups evidently could not sight because of broken cloud, and so retained their bombs until able to attack a target of opportunity. Direct hits were observed for the Lead Group.
     The rally after bombing was good and the return trip was made without incident until the Danish coast was reached. At that point, heavy and accurate flak was encountered. Captain Wallace, the Lead Bombardier, was wounded and began losing blood rapidly. Upon nearing a point about seventy-five miles from the English Coast, the Deputy Leader was ordered to take over the lead position while the lead aircraft proceeded directly to base.
     Enemy fighter attacks were observed to be heavy on some combat wing formations, but little opposition from enemy aircraft was encountered by the 94th “B” Combat Wing.
     Fighter support was very good with the exception of the trip out. This was evidently caused by the formation being a little off course and a few minutes late.
  2. Aircraft Not Attacking – Lead Box. Eighteen aircraft of the Lead Box were dispatched in the formation indicated on the following diagram. Previous to the time the Group was dispatched, no aircraft had left the formation.
     Aircraft 42-29853 [Should be 42-39853], pilot Lt. Borchert, was scheduled to fly in the #2 position, second element, Low Squadron. After a late take-off, however, it was found to be impossible to reach the formation. As a result, this aircraft returned from the Dutch Coast.
     Aircraft 42-37780, pilot, Lt. Miller, returned from the vicinity of the Dutch Coast when it was found that no control could be exercised over the RPM in operating range. Both of these aircraft were dispatched.
  3. General Narrative – Low Box. The Low Box took off and proceeded to Splasher 4 where assembly was made at 5,500 feet. The Low Group took its position in the combat wing before departure from Splasher 4.
     The briefed course was followed with little deviation, as is indicated on the Track Chart. The narrative for the Low Group between England and the IP is similar to that given for the Lead Group. The interval for bombing was taken at the IP. As indicated in the Lead Group Narrative, cloud cover would not permit bombing. The primary target was not attacked by the 94th “B” Combat Wing Formation. As indicated in the Lead Group Narrative, the secondary target was attacked. Clouds over the target, however, would not permit the Lead Bombardier of the Low Group to sight and bomb the secondary target.
     By altering course slightly to the right, it was possible for the Low Group to make a bomb run on what is believed to be Gülzow, Germany. Due to a reported bomb rack malfunction, the bombs were salvoed from the lead aircraft twenty seconds late. This delay caused the bombs of the Low Group to land over the target selected.
     After bombing, the Low Group made a left turn and took its position in the combat wing formation. It retained this position until base was reached and the formation was broken up.
  4. Aircraft Not Attacking – Low Box. All of the scheduled eighteen aircraft of the Low Group were dispatched and continued to attack a target of opportunity.
  5. Aircraft Lost. No aircraft were lost from either the Lead or Low Groups of the 94th “B” Combat Wing on the Mission of 11 April, 1944.
  6. Group Leaders and Combat Wing Air Commander. Major Leonard B. Roper and Captain Joseph F. Nesmith flew as Combat Wing Air Commander and Lead Group Leader, respectively. They flew in Aircraft 42-31875.
     Lt. Donald E. Floden, in Aircraft 42-97258, flew as Leader of the Low Group.
STATISTICAL SUMMARY
Lead GroupLow Group
No. of A/C Scheduled1818
No. of A/C Taking Off1818
No. of A/C Dispatched1818
No. of A/C Attacking1618
No. of A/C Not Attacking20
No. of A/C Lost00

[Signed] Clinton F. Ball, Lt. Colonel, Air Corps, Operations Officer






Bombardier’s Narrative – Lead Box:

Group: 351st Lead Box
Target: Pommersche Motorenbau at Arnimswalde near Stettin, Germany [now called Szczecin, Poland]
Method of Bombing: Visual
Altitude: 12,000’
Direction of Attack: 360° Mag. Heading
Wind Direction: 295°
Wind Velocity: 12 MPH
Bombardier’s Narrative: The I.P. was reached as briefed but due to heavy undercast, the Primary target could be seen and a run was made to the Secondary on a magnetic heading of 360°. The aiming point was as briefed. Synchronization was good and bombs were away at 1247. The Lead Bombardier had a rack malfunction and only the smoke bomb dropped at the proper time. The remainder were salvoed two seconds late. The Deputy Lead sighted for range and the Group dropped on his release.

[Signed:] William A. Winter, Captain, Air Corps, Group Bombardier



Bombardier’s Narrative – Low Box:

Group: 351st Low Box
Target: of Opportunity – Factory near Gülzow.
Method of Bombing: Visual
Altitude: 11,063’
Direction of Attack: 18° Mag. Heading
Wind Direction: 285°
Wind Velocity: 12 MPH
Bombardier’s Narrative: The Low Box of the 94th Combat Wing “B” Composite bombed a factory near Gülzow, Germany as a Target of Opportunity. Primary and Secondary targets were both obscured by clouds.
 A long building in center of group was chosen as A.P.[Aiming Point]. Bombs were away at 1256 hours on a magnetic heading of 18° Due to malfunction of release mechanism, M.P.I.[Mean Point of Impact] was over [past the target]. Bombsight in Deputy Lead’s ship was out and he could not sight for range.

[Signed:] Thomas E. Trolinger, 1st Lt., Air Corps, Lead Bombardier



Combat Bombing Flight Record – Lead Box:

Bombardier - Capt. Harvey H. Wallace  Pilot - Capt. J.F. Nesmith Navigator - 1st Lt. Leonard Korf
Aircraft B-17G 875-P  Take-off - 0730 Landed - 1800
Objective - Secondary – Pommersche Motorenbau at Arnimswalde, Germany
Aiming Point (MPI)[Mean Point of Impact] - Assembly building
Initial Point - ___
Method of Attack - Group
No. of Attacking A/C in Group: - 16   Composite Group -
Number A/C Dropping Bombs by own Sighting Operation:
Deflection and Range Sighting, Group: 1 Composite Group -
Range Sighting only, Group - 1    Composite Group -
Bombs, Types and Sizes - 9 x 500 G.P.[General Purpose] AN-M43 & 1 Sky Marker
Number of Bombs Loaded - 10   Released - 10
Fusing, Nose - 1/10   Tail - 1/100
Synchronization - On
Information at Release Point:

Altitude of Target - 30Magnetic Heading Ordered 70° Actual 360°
True Altitude Above Target - 11,763’True Heading 358°
Indicated Altitude - 12,000Drift, Estimated 2° Right - Actual 4° Right
Pressure Altitude of Target -94True Track 002°
Altimeter Setting 29.92Actual Range 7,488'
Calculated Indicated Air Speed - 150 M.P.H.B.S. Type - M-9L Mercury
True Air Speed - 180 M.P.H.Time of Release 1247
Ground Speed Est. 194 Actual 174Length of Bombing Run - 120 sec.
Wind Direction Metro - 280° Actual - 295°Intervalometer Setting - Salvo
Wind Velocity Metro 14 Actual 12 C-1 Pilot [Autopilot] Yes
D.S. - 190.3  Trail - 39   ATF - 27.9A-5 Pilot _____
Tan. D.A, Est. .63 Actual .56 Manual Pilot - ____

Type of Release - Salvo
Point of Impact If Seen - Yes
Mean Temp. Metro - 0 Actual - 0
Winds - Altitude - 12,000 Ft.  Direction - Metro 280°  Actual 295°  Velocity - Metro 14  Actual 12
Temp C. - Metro -12° C. Actual -10° C.



Combat Bombing Flight Record – Low Box:

Bombardier - 1st Lt. Trolinger, Thomas E.  Pilot - 1st Lt. Floden, Donald E. Navigator - 1st Lt. Badger, William D.
Aircraft # 258-P  Take-off - 0730  Landed - 1810
Objective - Target of Opportunity – Factory near Gülzow, Germany.
Aiming Point (MPI)[Mean Point of Impact] - Long building in center of group.
Initial Point - ___
Method of Attack - Group
Number of Attacking A/C in Group - 18    Composite Group -
Number A/C Dropping Bombs by own sighting operation -
Deflection and Range sighting, Group - 1   Composite Group -
Range Sighting only, Group - 1    Composite Group -
Bombs, Types and Sizes - 9 x 500 LB. AN M43 G.P.[General Purpose] & 1 Smoke Bomb
Number of Bombs Loaded - 10    Released - 10
Fusing, Nose - 1/10    Tail - 1/100
Synchronization - On
Information at Release Point:

Altitude of Target - ____Magnetic Heading Ordered 70° Actual 18°
True Altitude Above Target - 11,063True Heading 15°
Indicated Altitude - 11,300Drift, Estimated 2° Right - Actual 4° Right
Pressure Altitude of Target +49True Track 22°
Altimeter Setting 29.92Actual Range 6,500'
Calculated Indicated Air Speed - 150 M.P.H.B.S. Type - M9 - 12389
True Air Speed - 177 M.P.H.Time of Release 12561
Ground Speed Est. 190 Actual 175Length of Bombing Run - 130 sec.
Wind Direction Metro - 280° Actual - 285°Intervalometer Setting - Salvo
Wind Velocity Metro 14 Actual 12 C-1 Pilot [Autopilot] Yes
D.S. - 196.  Trail - 38   ATF - 26.9A-5 Pilot _____
Tan. D.A, Est. .64 Actual .57Manual Pilot _____

Type of Release - Salvo
Point of Impact If Seen - ___
Mean Temp. Metro 0 Actual _____
Winds - Altitude - 11,000 Ft.  Direction - Metro 280° Actual ___° Velocity - Metro 14 Actual ___
Temp C. - Metro -12° C. Actual ___° C.



Preliminary Damage Assessment:
  1. The target for the Lead Group was the secondary target of Pommersche Motorenbau at Arnimswalde, Germany. Photo coverage was excellent. The target had been bombed previously and smoke was coming from a machine shop. No other damage could be seen.
  2. The pattern of the lead group was concentrated in the main target area and tremendous damage should be done. The pattern was 2,562 feet by 2,057 feet and the actual MPI was 340 feet short and to the right. Approximate damage includes:
    1. A large assembly shop (MPI) [Mean Point of Impact] received a direct salvo in the middle of the building, and another salvo at the upper end.
    2. The main machine shop received a direct salvo of bombs at the North end.
    3. A heavy concentration of bombs between unidentified building and main store. Blast should damage both.
    4. Salvo in middle of eastern machine shop.
    5. Concentration of bombs hitting main road.
    6. A salvo scoring near miss at SW corner of machine shop.
    7. A heavy concentration of bombs on middle machine shop.
    8. Concentration of bombs at end of engine test beds. Blast damage should result.
  3. There are three salvoes of bombs in wooded areas near the target. No damage done.
  4. The low group bombed an unidentified target of opportunity. A pattern of 2,570 feet by 1,435 feet landed in open fields near a processing plant of some kind. No damage will be done.
[Signed:] Thomas L. Cooper, 1st Lt., Air Corps, Group P.I. [Photo Intelligence] Officer


Intelligence S-2 Reports:
  1. 50 parcels of G-30 Leaflets were dropped near Stettin by the Low Group which bombed Gülzow, a target of opportunity.
  2. The Lead Group which bombed the assigned secondary had excellent results. The Lead ship had a direct hit on the assigned MPI [Mean Point Of Impact] and the bombing pattern was fairly scattered. Pictures taken by the Low Group show bombs in an unidentified wooded area, at what the lead crew believed to be in the vicinity of 53°47’N-14°56’E. [SE of Ronica, Poland & NE of Kłodzino, Poland]
  3. Our two boxes saw 15 to 25 E/A [Enemy Aircraft] mostly ME 109’s and FW 190’s from a point just North of Hannover to a point near Magdeburg on the route in. Practically no passes were made at this CBW, but a few nose attacks were made in a half-hearted fashion. Enemy fighters were present for about an hour. A few ME 110’s and ME 410’s were seen between the IP [Initial Point of Bomb Run] and Arnimswalde but no attacks were made. Colorings were silver, black, or mottled gray and brown. Fighter cover was responsible for the small number of actual attacks. One E/A [Ememy Aircraft] probably destroyed by this Group.
  4. While crossing the coast near Alkmaar [Netherlands] our formation encountered meager fairly accurate flak. From Lingen to Brunswick flak was almost continuous, being especially intense and accurate at Lingen, Diepholz, and Hannover, where several ships in the wing to our right appeared to be hit, and at Brunswick where flak was quite accurate for our formation. At the secondary target flak was meager and accurate. On the way back particularly accurate flak, moderate to intense, was encountered, most of it appearing to come from the Kiel area; black, white, and a few red bursts were observed. On the route in, meager flak was observed over Ostend and Brussels, but this formation was out of range. Moderate barrages were seen over Bonn and Hamm, but again this formation did not come within range of these installations.
  5. Weather was good up until the briefed Primary where clouds prevented bombing it. Heading North towards the assigned Secondary the weather cleared and permitted visual bombing. There were some clouds again over the Baltic. Clouds prevented visual bombing, being 10/10ths over the target area.
  6. Crews reported an Airfield with 22 fighters just before the IP. Another airfield with approximately 20 fighters was observed near 52°18’N-12°08’E [South of Genthin, Germany.] One crew reported an airfield at 54°28’N-09°32’E [SE of Busdorf, Germany] with what appeared to be 20 to 30 T/E [Twin Engine] aircraft. What appeared to be a large military camp was observed near the IP and balloon barrages were also seen in this area. One crew reported seeing what appeared to be 20 transport planes at the Burg Airfield at approximately 52°16’N-11°55’E. [ENE of Magdeburg] One crew also reported observing balloon barrage near Wittenburg.
  7. Fighter support was generally reported as being very good. Most crews reported B-17’s going down in the area near Hannover with numerous parachutes seen. One B-17 was observed going towards Sweden.
[Signed] Robert P. Ramsey, Capt., Air Corps, Group S-2 [Intelligence]


Track Chart and Combat Duplication Check Form:
Click on Chart to Enlarge



Enemy Tactics Report:

1. No report on enemy tactics beyond that contained in paragraph 3 of the Narrative Teletype [S-2 Narrative – Intelligence] is being submitted.

[Signed:] Robert P. Ramsey, Captain, Air Corp, Group S-2 [Intelligence]



A.A. Gunfire (Flak) Report:

1. Target: Assigned - Cottbus, Germany Bombed - Arnimswalde, Germany (Lead); Gülzow(?) Germany (Low)
2. Route as Flown. - About 4 miles South of briefed route to IP – Cottbus – Arnimswalde -- 54°50’N-15°00’E [South of Bornholm Island] – North end of Falster Island - 55°50’N-11°05’E [SE of Sejerø, Denmark] -- 51°40’N-10°30E [NNE of Bad Lauterberg] – Nordstrand Island.
3. Weather Conditions - A. at Target. - 4 to 9/10 cloud  B. En route - 3 to 5/10 increasing to 7/10 over Southern Denmark
4. Were our A/C "Seen" or "Unseen" targets? (a) At Target - not known (b) Enroute - not known
 Any Condensation Trails? - No
5. Description of Flak, including type of Fire Control: Arnimswalde: Moderate continuous following, accurate for height and deflection; black and white bursts were reported.
No flak at Low Group Target.
6. Flak encountered or observed en route. (In the order experienced) -
 Alkmaar – 1000 hrs., 14,300’ – meager, height good, deflection poor.
 Lingen – 1033 hrs., 15,000’ – intense, inaccurate.
 Hesepe – 1034, 15,000’ – moderate, height good, deflection poor.
 Vechta – 1035, 15,000’ – moderate, fairly accurate.
 Diepholz – 1038, 14,800’ – meager, fairly accurate.
 Hannover – 1054, 15,000 ft. – Intense, accurate continuous following; some of our ships were hit here, and at least five ships in the wing flying on our right appeared to be seriously damaged.
 Brunswick – 1121, 11,800 – Intense, accurate.
 Eckernförde - Bay Area – 1458, 11,000 ft., - moderate, very accurate continuous following. As many as six red bursts were seen, followed by black and white bursts. Several of our ships were damaged here.
All flak was believed to be continuous following.
7. Was Chaff carried? - Yes How discharged? As briefed
8. Position of Group - 8. Lead, Low
9. Lead Group – 351 A/C over enemy terr. – 16 A/C damaged – 12 A/C lost to flak – 0 Time over Target – ___ Time of bombs away – 1247 Height – 11,000’ Axis of attack – 08° Mag. Bomb run – 120 sec.
Low Group – 351 A/C over enemy terr. – 18 A/C damaged – 3 A/C lost to flak – 0 Time over Target – ___ Time of bombs away – 1256 Height – 11,500’ Axis of attack – 18° Mag. Bomb run – 130 sec.
10. Comments - Phenomena: 10. Major Roper, pilot of the lead ship in the Lead Box, reported seeing three small airplanes, one somewhat larger than the other two, come up from Stettin ahead of our formation at great speed and at a very steep angle of climb, leaving dense contrails. They climbed much higher than our flight altitude and moved about in the air for some time.



Combat Crew Comments:

    508th SQUADRON
A/C 325–H Would like double rations on long missions. – Whole Crew.

    509th SQUADRON
A/C 202–Z This mission was flown too low, considering the amount of flak we flew over. - Lt. Keese.
A/C 005–Q I think that 15,000 feet is too low! - Lt. Wroblewski.

    510th SQUADRON
A/C 714–T P-51’s turned nose into formation. We fired on one once but did not hit it. – Lt. McIntyre.
A/C 077–D T-994 (Lt. Nall) came down at IP and weaved back and forth in front of low squadron; messed up formation. He went up and rode on wing of No. 3 man in Lead Squadron. – Lt. Dennis.
Poor planning, to go in at 14,000 feet. – Lt. Burg.

    511th SQUADRON
A/C 848–C High Squadron flew right over us. – Lt. Zotollo.
A/C 318–S Lead Navigator did good job on flak. – Lt. Brooks.
A/C 238–A Have P-51’s keep their noses out of formation. – Lt. Pryor.
A/C 153–F Careless driver on way in from dispersal threw five guns and map case out of truck. – Lt. Willard.
Food in EM’s [Enlisted Men's] Mess is awfully bad after mission. – All EM.

[Signed] Robert P. Ramsey, Major, Air Corps, Group S-2 [Intelligence]



Mission Summary Report – Low Box:
  1. Abortives: None
  2. Battle Damage:
    1. Airplane No. 42-38146, 508th Squadron. Small flak hole on left side of Navigator’s compartment. Skin and “GEE” wiring damaged. Small flak hole through right wing tip, skin and corrugation damaged.
    2. Airplane No. 42-97258, 508th Squadron. Small flak hole on top of #3 Engine. Skin, baffle plate and ring cowling damaged. Flak forward of ball turret. Skin and stiffener damaged. Flak hole through center of vertical stabilizer. Skin damage only.
    3. Airplane No. 42-97066, 508th Squadron. Flak hole through left wing underside between #1 and #2 Engines. Skin, corrugation and feeder tank damaged. Small flak hole in left bomb bay door, skin and electrical wiring damaged. Right aileron torn by flak. Two very small flak holes in left wing outer panel leading edge. Damage to skin and de-icer boot.
    4. Airplane No. 42-97149, 509th Squadron. Flak hole near leading edge of right wing underside, flak damaged skin, corrugation and main spar. Fabric of left elevator torn by flak.
    5. Airplane No. 42-107077, 510th Squadron. Small flak hole through right horizontal stabilizer. Skin and channel damaged. Flak hole in left wing outer panel. Skin, corrugation and main spar damaged.
    TOTAL A/C DAMAGEDMINOR DAMAGEDAMAGE BY FLAK
    955
[Signed:] Carl A. Ekblad, Captain, Air Corps, Group Engineering Officer


Mission Summary Report – Lead Box:
  1. Abortives:
    1. Airplane No. 42-39853, 510th Squadron returned early due to the Pilot’s inability to locate the formation.
    2. Airplane No. 42-37780, 511th Squadron returned early because of a malfunctioning #1 Propeller Governor. Investigation revealed a faulty governor.
  2. Battle Damage:
    1. Airplane No. 42-97305, 508th Squadron. Flak ripped left side of vertical stabilizer, damaging skin and structural members. Small flak hole on top of #3 Engine nacelle, skin damage only.
    2. Airplane No. 42-97325, 508th Squadron. Small flak hole in right wing underside outer panel. Skin and Tokyo tank damaged. Small flak hole in left wing inner panel through wing, skin, corrugation and one Tokyo tank damaged. Small flak hole in left horizontal stabilizer leading edge underside. Damage to skin and de-icer boot.
    3. Airplane No. 42-97318, 511th Squadron. Small flak hole in skin of left wing top side inner panel near #1 Engine. Small flak hole in leading edge of right wing outer panel, skin damage only.
    4. Airplane No. 42-107005, 511th Squadron. Small flak hole on right side of Navigator’s compartment, skin and stiffeners damaged.
    5. Airplane No. 42-31748, 511th Squadron. Small flak hole through right horizontal stabilizer. Skin and stiffener damaged. Flak hole in leading edge of left wing near landing light lens. Skin, corrugation and vacuum line damaged.
    6. Airplane No. 42-31875, 511th Squadron. Flak hole in center of plexiglass nose section. Small flak hole underside of left wing near #1 Engine. Skin and corrugation damaged.
    7. Airplane No. 42-97492, 511th Squadron. Flak hole through the right flap. Skin and stiffeners damaged. Small flak hole in Plexiglass nose section.
    8. Airplane No. 42-31238, 511th Squadron. Small flak hole in left wing fairing underside. Flak damaged push rod housing on #3 Engine.
    9. Airplane No. 42-31714, 511th Squadron. Small flak hole in left side of Navigator’s compartment, skin and stiffener damaged. Flak damaged Sump on #2 Engine.
    10. Airplane No. 42-97472, 511th Squadron. Flak hole underside of left horizontal stabilizer. Skin damage only. Fabric of right aileron torn by flak.
    TOTAL A/C DAMAGEDMINOR DAMAGEDAMAGE BY FLAK
    101010
[Signed:] Carl A. Ekblad, Captain, Air Corps, Group Engineering Officer


Armament Report – Lead & Low Boxes:
  1. The following armament malfunctions and failures were reported on the mission of 11 April, 1944 – Lead Box.
    1. A/C 42-38153 – Bomb bay doors opened on run on the primary target. Group did not bomb. Bombardier attempted to close doors electrically and failed. He jettisoned bombs on Pilot’s order twenty minutes from the target of opportunity was bombed. Bomb bay doors were then cranked up. Check shows bomb bay door motor fuse blown out.
    2. A/C 42-97066 – Bomb salvoed on time. Investigation showed no malfunction of electrical system.
  2. The following armament malfunctions and failures were reported on the mission of 11 April, 1944 – Low Box.
    1. A/C 42-37827 – The sky marker bomb would not release electrically or salvo. It was dropped by lifting the shackle out of the rack and dropping bomb with Investigation showed A-2 and station release O.K. Reason for malfunction could not be found as shackle was dropped with bomb.
    2. A/C 42-38146 – Bomb bay doors would not work electrically. Checked out satisfactorily on the ground.
    3. A/C 42-97196 – Left nose gun would not extract from belt. Check shows weak ejector. Being replaced.
    4. A/C 42-97193 – The bombardier report as follows: “The bomb bay doors inoperative. On the bomb run, attempted to salvo with bombardier’s salvo switch. The Pilot then attempted to salvo with his switch. Bombardier went to bomb bay and dropped bombs with the bomb bay salvo switch fifteen (15) minutes late.” The ship checks out on the ground. Investigation shows bombs were dropped by Pilot’s salvo switch. Bombardier is not familiar with this type of aircraft (all electrical ship) and needs further instruction.
[Signed:] Michael Steele, CWO, USA, Group Armament Officer


Ammunition Expenditure – Lead and Low Combat Boxes:

1. The Station Ordnance Officer has reported the expenditure of 2,930 rounds of Caliber .50 ammunition on the Mission of 11 April, 1944 – Lead Combat Box.
2. The Station Ordnance Officer has reported the expenditure of 3,995 rounds of Caliber .50 Ammunition on the Mission of 11 April, 1944 – Low Combat Box.

[Signed:] Robert B. Stratton, Captain, Air Corps, Statistical Officer



Disposition of Bombs – Lead Combat Box:

1. Following is the disposition of all bombs loaded for the mission of 11 April, 1944.

AIRCRAFTBOMBS
Main BombfallOver TargetBombingNumberSizeTypeFusing: NoseTail
(Arnimswalde)1616158500 lb.M-431/101/100
Total Bombs Dropped158500 lb.M-431/101/100
Bombs Brought Back20500 lb.M-431/101/100
TOTAL BOMBS LOADED178500 lb.M-431/101/100

[Signed:] Robert B. Stratton, Captain, Air Corps, Statistical Officer



Disposition of Bombs – Low Combat Box:

1. Following is the disposition of all bombs for the Mission of 11 April, 1944.

AIRCRAFTBOMBS
Main BombfallOver TargetBombingNumberSizeTypeFusing: NoseTail
(Gülzow)1817168500 lb.M-431/101/100
Bombs Brought BackNone500 lb.M-431/101/100
TOTAL BOMBS LOADED168500 lb.M-431/101/100
[Signed:] Robert B. Stratton, Captain, Air Corps, Statistical Officer



Deficiencies and Disabilities:

1. The following deficiencies and disabilities were determined from interrogation:
    508th Bombardment Sq.
A/C 151 Socket on Rheostat in Radio Room burned out. – Sgt. McGarrity.
Left and Right glove burned out. – Sgt. Hoagland.

[Signed:] Ernest J. Cater, 1st Lt., Air Corps, Group Equipment Officer


Aircraft Returning Early:

Aircraft No. 39853 Squadron - 510th   Pilot - Borchert
Time of Abortive - 1000  Location when Aborted - Dutch Coast
Reason - Late take-off 1:06. Unable to intercept formation before reaching Dutch Coast.
Disposition of Bombs: Returned
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 15,000’  
Enemy Opposition Encountered - Flak at coast
Remarks:
[Signed] M.J.Borchert



Aircraft No. 37780 Squadron - 511th   Pilot - Miller
Time of Abortive - 0955  Location when Aborted - 52°37’N-04°37’E [Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands]
Reason - No control over R.P.M. in operating range.
Disposition of Bombs:
Altitude At Time of Aborting: 14,500’  
Enemy Opposition Encountered - None
Remarks: Guns in poor shape.
[Signed] Carl J. Miller



“J” Form:
  1. Call Letter and Last Four numbers of A/C in each Squadron:
    a. 94th Composite Combat Wing  Lead Group
    Sqdn 508th A/C: 7305–L, 7066–O, 7324–H
    Sqdn 509th A/C: 9914–S, 7202–Z
    Sqdn 510th A/C: 9853–P, 9823–O, 9853–P, 9763–D, 9848–F
    Sqdn 511th A/C: 1875–P, 7472–H, 1748–V, 1238–A, 9948–C, 8153–F, 7191–X, 7780–G, 7005–Q, 7492–B, 7318–S, 1714–R

    b. 94th Composite Combat Wing  Low Group
    Sqdn 508th A/C: 7258–P, 6151–M, 8146–D, 7827–J, 0994–T, 7157–N
    Sqdn 509th A/C: 8005–G, 1725–L, 0499–Q, 3542–V, 7149–X, 7193–P, 684–T
    Sqdn 510th A/C: 7077–D, 7714–T, 0857–J, 7196–M, 1721–S, 1975–O
    Sqdn 511th A/C: None
  2. Target: GH-396C
  3. W/T and R/T Operational Call Sign of each Squadron:
    Squadron508 [Call Sign]W/T RRV R/T SEAGREENSquadron510 [Call Sign]W/T NGU R/T RANGER
    Squadron509 [Call Sign]W/T MXP R/T CUPPINGSquadron511 [Call Sign]W/T LOO R/T UNCLASP
  4. "A" Low Box: Taxi–0710; Take-Off –0725; E.T.D. Field–0725
    "B" High Box: Taxi–0710; Take-Off –0725; E.T.D. Field–0725
  5. Time:Height:  Place of crossing English Coast: (OUT)
    09168,000 Ft Orfordness
  6. Time:Height:  Place of Recrossing Enemy Coast: (IN)
    095515,000 Ft 52°37'N-04°37'E [Egmond aan Zee, Netherlands]
  7. Time:Height:  Place of Recrossing Enemy Coast: (Out)
    144912,000 Ft 54°30'N-08°50'E [Approx 1mi W of Nordstrand, Germany]
  8. Time:Height:  Place of crossing English Coast: (IN)
    16552,000 Ft Cromer
  9. E.T.R.(Estimated Time of Return) Base: 1730 Hours
  10. MF/DF [Medium Frequency/Direction Finder] Section: "G"
  11. Bomb load of Each A/C: "A" Lead Box
    508 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]
    509 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]
    510 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]
    511 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]


    Bomb load of Each A/C: Low Box
    508 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]
    509 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]
    510 Squadron: 10 x 500# G.P. [General Purpose] 1/10 x 1/100 [Nose & Tail Fuse]
    511 Squadron: None
  12. Fuel Load of each A/C: 2700 Gallons
  13. Group Leader:
    a. Lead Box: Name: Leonard B. Roper Rank: Major A/C: 1875-P  Sqdn. 511th
    b. Low Box: Name: Donald F. Floden Rank: 1st Lt. A/C: 7258-P Sqdn. 508th
  14. Passengers, if any: (Full Name, Rank, A/C and Squadron Passenger flying with)
    None
  15. Actual Times Off and Return by Squadrons and A/C Letters:
  16. Lead Box
    SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.
    5087305–L5099914–S
    7066–O7202–Z
    7325–H
    5109853–P5111875–P
    7472–H
    1748–V
    1238–A
    9848–C
    8153–F
    7191–X
    7780–G
    1714–R
    7005–Q
    7492–B
    7318–S
  17. Low Box
    SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.SquadronA/C No. & LetterA.T.O.A.T.R.
    5087258–P5098005–G
    6151–M1725–L
    8146–O0499–Q
    7827–J3542–V
    0994–T7149–X
    7157–N7193–P
    5107077–D511NONE
    7714–T
    0857–J
    7196–M
    1721–S
    1975–O

    Report Compiled By John Maksimik, S/Sgt.



Formation Chart:
Lead Group Formation Take–Off
511th Squadron
Roper, L.B. - Nesmith
A/C 42-31875 P
Turbyne
A/C 42-31748 V
Power
A/C 42-97472 H
Pryor
A/C 42-31238 A
Willard
A/C 42-38153 F
Zotollo
A/C 42-39848 C
509th Squadron508th Squadron
Logan
A/C 42-39914 S
Kogelman
A/C 42-97305 L
Fowler
A/C 42-31714 R
Keese
A/C 42-97202 Z
Johnson
A/C 42-97191 X
Overholt
A/C 42-97066 O
Wroblewski
A/C 42-107005 Q
Nelson
A/C 42-97325 H
Scarlett
A/C 42-97492 B
Borchert
A/C 42-39853 P
Miller
A/C 42-37780 G
Brooks
A/C 42-97318 S


Lead Group Formation Over–Target
511th Squadron
Roper, L.B. - Nesmith
A/C 42-31875 P
Turbyne
A/C 42-31748 V
Power
A/C 42-97472 H
Pryor
A/C 42-31238 A
Willard
A/C 42-38153 F
Zotollo
A/C 42-39848 C
509th Squadron508th Squadron
Logan
A/C 42-39914 S
Kogelman
A/C 42-97305 L
Fowler
A/C 42-31714 R
Keese
A/C 42-97202 Z
Johnson
A/C 42-97191 X
Overholt
A/C 42-97066 O
Wroblewski
A/C 42-107005 Q
Nelson
A/C 42-97325 H
Scarlett
A/C 42-97492 B
Brooks
A/C 42-97318 S

Time Schedule:
Zero Hour: 0830  Briefing: 0400  Stations: 0650  Start Engines: 0700  Taxi: 0710  Take-off: 0725  Leave Base: 0725 [Breakfast: 0300]



Formation Chart:
Low Group Formation Take–Off
508th Squadron
Floden-McCafferty
A/C 42-97258 P
Blaisdell
A/C 42-38146 D
Crowe
A/C 42-6151 M*
Dixey
A/C 42-37827 J
Sengstock
A/C 42-97157 N
Nall
A/C 42-30994 T*
510th Squadron509th Squadron
Dennis
A/C 42-107077 D
Wolcott
A/C 42-38005 G
Morris
A/C 42-30857 J*
McIntyre
A/C 42-37714 T
Redmond
A/C 42-30499 Q*
Berardi
A/C 42-31725 L
Raser
A/C 42-97196 M
Bartzocas
A/C 42-3542 V*
Hopkins
A/C 42-31975 O
Chalmers
A/C 42-31721 S
Hatten
A/C 42-97193 P
McLawhorn
A/C 42-97149 X


Low Group Formation Over Target
508th Squadron
Floden-McCafferty
A/C 42-97258 P
Blaisdell
A/C 42-38146 D
Crowe
A/C 42-6151 M*
Dixey
A/C 42-37827 J
Sengstock
A/C 42-97157 N
Nall
A/C 42-30994 T*
510th Squadron509th Squadron
Dennis
A/C 42-107077 D
Wolcott
A/C 42-38005 G
Morris
A/C 42-30857 J*
McIntyre
A/C 42-37714 T
Redmond
A/C 42-30499 Q*
Berardi
A/C 42-31725 L
Raser
A/C 42-97196 M
Bartzocas
A/C 42-3542 V*
Hopkins
A/C 42-31975 O
Chalmers
A/C 42-31721 S
Hatten
A/C 42-97193 P
McLawhorn
A/C 42-97149 X

 * - B-17F

Time Schedule:
Zero Hour: 0830  Briefing: 0500  Stations: 0650  Start Engines: 0700  Taxi: 0710  Take-off: 0725  Leave Base: 0725 [Breakfast: 0300]

 [Wounded - 1]
The above records were obtained at the National Archives Records Administration and have been declassified by authority NND 745005
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